John Carey Head and Neck Cancer Scholarship

John Carey

The John Carey Head and Neck Cancer Scholarship provides funding support for students and fellows engaged in head and neck cancer research and clinical care activities at the University of Wisconsin.

John Carey was diagnosed with hypopharynx cancer in 2006 at the age of 77. John underwent a series of surgery and radiation treatments and functioned exceptionally well until the cancer eventually took his life in 2012. On behalf of his family, the funds are used to provide funding support to students and fellows engaged in head and neck cancer research at the University of Wisconsin.

You can make a gift online to support the John Carey Head and Neck Cancer Scholarship.

John & Janice Carey with family members and Bucky at the 2011 Head & Neck Cancer golf outing.“The main thing that carried me through these years is the wonderful support from my family – my wife, Janice, our five children & their spouses, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, other family members and many, many friends!It is important to me to stay active. I own a farm in Mineral Point so I maintain the grounds and feed cattle; always work to be done on a farm! We are Badger football season ticket holders and attend all the home games, as well as the weekly Mendota Gridiron meetings.

I want to thank my physicians, Drs. Paul Harari and Greg Hartig, Nurse Peggy Wiederholt, numerous Radiation Oncology and ENT clinic staff who have helped me over the years. Their clinical expertise, kindness and compassion have been invaluable to me and my family.

– John Carey

Hypopharynx Cancer

Donate to the John Carey Head and Neck Cancer Scholarship

Support the University of Wisconsin to help continue the tradition of excellence in teaching, research, and public service.

Make a Gift

This is a challenging type of head and neck cancer that develops deep in the throat. For small cancers in this region, surgery or radiation can often eliminate the cancer and preserve normal speech. For larger tumors, it may be necessary to remove the larynx. Approximately 50,000 patients develop head and neck cancer each year in the US, and advances in surgery, radiation and chemotherapy strive to cure more patients and diminish side effects.